fieldbears:

whatiwishicould:

ohhlivvyarr:

In the early 1980s, the Naval Investigative Service was investigating homosexuality in the Chicago area. Agents discovered that gay men sometimes referred to themselves as “friends of Dorothy.” Unaware of the historical meaning of the term (relating to The Wizard Of Oz), the NIS believed that there actually was some woman named Dorothy at the centre of a massive ring of homosexual military personnel, so they launched an enormous and futile hunt for the elusive “Dorothy”, hoping to find her and convince her to reveal the names of gay servicemembers.

If you don’t think that’s hilarious then you’re wrong.

Wikipedia article

oh my god, straight people

Penny Penny

anianioxenfree:

These people saying that the hacked women simply should not have had naked photos are buying into a mentality that begins its inculcation into many of us in childhood. A mentality that I’ll call “Share it With the Class.” This mentality operates as though once people become aware of a private thing that they’re curious about, their awareness of its existence means that it should belong to them too. At first, it sounds like this:

"Beth, if you’re going to invite one person to your party, you have to invite everybody."

"Matthew, I see you’ve given Jose a fruit snack; I hope you brought enough for the whole class, young man."

"Um, Amber? I hope you don’t mind that note being read aloud to everybody, young lady!"  

In adulthood, we are granted a tad more privacy from those around us since we have fewer people actively in control of our actions day-to-day and by actively I mean in-person-people monitoring what we say and do. But even in the workplace, where what we do with our hours is clocked and guided, there is still always an underlying layer of privacy that you don’t share with those who Want To Know.  Your boss doesn’t know that you text about weekend plans or deleted that email on purpose or took an undocumented break or bought some shoes online during work hours or read a book during work hours or played a pointless-but-engrossing game on your phone or posted to Facebook about how annoying your boss is. But even though this stuff is undeniably part of who we are and what we do, there is still an argument against the victims of any kind of unwanted exposure, unwelcome sharing of info, uninvited exploitation which implies that had the victim lived their lives in constant self-protection of the worst case-scenario, they would not have become a victim.

Don’t do ANYTHING you wouldn’t want EVERYBODY to know about and you’ll be safe from being revealed!

To this I have to say: Sure, actually! But also: COME ON.

We are all deliberately careful about some risk, but not all risk. Taking an intimate or private part of ourselves out of our brains and putting it somewhere else, anywhere else, carries with it the risk of exploitation, but in one case or another, we all choose to bring it out anyway and hope for the best; the best being: we will still be in control of where whatever-we-brought-out goes, and how it is used, and by whom.

Now, the fact that this isn’t, like, a hacker releasing all these women’s personal phone numbers is why there is condemnation. Taking NAKED SELFIES (coming to HBO, September 2019, probably) is not something that everybody has done and so the people condemning these women either

A: Do not take or share naked selfies 

or

B: Do not have a platform that fame or certain types of power provide

If this exploitation didn’t involve S E X, an element of human nature that is most intimately wrapped-up and tangled with “blame the victim” logic, would we be blaming the victim? Because everybody keeps personal information somewhere other than just in their heads, information that they wouldn’t want to give to All of the Public. Which means e v e r y b o d y is at risk of exploitation. These women who have been currently and infamously exploited are no more “at fault” for their own exploitation than you are if you have:

  • Passwords in the Notes app on your code-protected iPhone
  • Clicked “save password” on any website ever
  • Written private feelings in a journal or in a document on your computer
  • Kept a spare key in a hidden spot
  • Sent a text message that you wouldn’t want everyone to read
  • Not paid the extra $7 to “protect your tickets” on Ticketmaster
  • Used an Uber
  • Put your place on Airbnb

So then, which of us can cast the first stone? Not-a-one, I tell you. Not-a-one.

And I hate that this conversation has made me resort to biblical quotes, but it seems that it 

HAS

COME

TO

THIS.

Anonymous asked: why is self diagnosis bad

sewer-mermaid:

from psychologytoday.com

  • When you self-diagnose, you are essentially assuming that you know the subtleties that diagnosis constitutes. This can be very dangerous, as people who assume that they can surmise what is going on with themselves may miss the nuances of diagnosis. For example, people with mood swings often think that they have manic-depressive illness or bipolar disorder. However, mood swings are a symptom that can be a part of many different clinical scenarios, borderline personality disorder and major depression being two examples of other diagnoses. The clinician can help you discern whether you swing from normal to down or down to up, and by considering how long the mood swings last, the clinician can make the appropriate diagnosis. Here, the danger is that you may misdirect the clinician or even yourself.
  • One of the greatest dangers of self diagnosis in psychological syndromes, is that you may miss a medical disease that masquerades as a psychiatric syndrome. Thus, if you have panic disorder, you may miss the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism or an irregular heart beat. Even more serious is the fact that some brain tumors may present with changes in personality or psychosis or even depression. If you assume you have depression and treat it with an over-the-counter preparation, you may completely miss a medical syndrome. Even if you do not want conventional treatment for depression, you may want conventional treatment for a brain tumor.
  • Self-diagnosis also undermines the role of the doctor-which is not the best way to start the relationship. While doctors are generally very enthusiastic about getting packaged information, it would help if you actually trusted your doctor. If your doctor is someone whom you cannot trust, then think again about why you see this doctor. Your doctor should respect your opinion, but the discussion should be an active one. If you doubt the doctor’s diagnosis, tell him or her that you do and say why. This is much better than silently diagnosing your own syndrome.
  • Then there is the fact that we can know and see ourselves, but sometimes, we need a mirror to see ourselves more clearly. The doctor is that mirror. By self-diagnosing, you may be missing something that you cannot see. For example, you may be overwhelmed by anxiety and think that you have an anxiety disorder. The anxiety disorder may be covering up a major depressive disorder. Approximately 2/3 of people who present to outpatient clinics with anxiety have depression as well. In general, when two or more syndromes occur in the same person, we call this comorbidity. When people self-diagnose, they often miss the comorbidity that exists.
  • Another danger of self diagnosis is that you may think that there is more wrong with you than there actually is. For example, if you had insomnia, inattention and depression, you may believe that you have a sleep disorder, ADD and major depression. However, major depression can account for all of these symptoms. Thus, you may make things worse by worrying more as well.
  • Self-diagnosis is also a problem when you are in a state of denial about your symptoms. You may think that you have generalized body aches that started when your mood got worse, but a doctor may elect to do an EKG for chest pain that reveals possible coronary artery disease. You may have been trying to avoid the chest pain or you may have minimized this.
  • Lastly, there are certain syndromes that may not seem like problems to you even though they are very disruptive to your life. For example, with delusional disorder people do not think that they are delusional and because they are not overtly psychotic, they may not think to report paranoid symptoms that add up to delusional disorder. Also, many personality disorders are not spontaneously reported since they are usually problematic to other people.
  • Thus, self-diagnosis can have tremendous negative repercussions on the patient. For this reason, while reading is helpful and informative, it is always best to discuss your impressions with a doctor before you decide on the treatment you want.

fartgallery:

I SPENT 6 HOURS MAKING THIS BALLOON PIT AND IT DOESNT EVEN WORK

betalars:

friend-zoning guys is horrible. it is disgusting. funzone them instead. send them to a small childs park so they can cry with the other babies when they dont get what they want.

singingsh0wtunes:

subway sure doesn’t mess around when it comes to puns

singingsh0wtunes:

subway sure doesn’t mess around when it comes to puns

syntheticmomma:

lupusadlunam:

thechangelingmedusa:
Like seriously, why isn’t pole dancing an olympic sport? This is freakin gymnastics. This is strength and skill. This is not sexual whatsoever. Why does pole dancing have to be so stigmatised as a sexual thing that only strippers do? I have great respect for all people who can pull this off. This is art and beauty right here. 

HEY FUN FACT: pole dancing is known as something strippers do because strippers invented it. And that’s okay! It’s okay to have respect for strippers and the hard work they put into what they do! Let’s stop trying to take the stripper part out of pole dancing so upperclass white girls can do it without being ~stigmatized~ because god forbid women be sexual.

Forms of pole dancing have been practised for hundreds of years, as outlined on the International Pole Dance Fitness Association site. Check out Mallakhamb, a form of Indian pole fitness, which is traditionally a male-centric sport. It was Westernised by exotic dancers and circus performers in the 20th century, but the idea has been around for centuries. Claiming that ‘strippers invented it’ kind of erases the pole’s history in other cultures.  
And the IPDFA is campaigning for it to be recognised as an Olympic sport, because it does actually require a lot of athleticism (which is where pole dancing’s roots are). 

syntheticmomma:

lupusadlunam:

thechangelingmedusa:

Like seriously, why isn’t pole dancing an olympic sport? This is freakin gymnastics. This is strength and skill. This is not sexual whatsoever. Why does pole dancing have to be so stigmatised as a sexual thing that only strippers do? I have great respect for all people who can pull this off. This is art and beauty right here. 

HEY FUN FACT: pole dancing is known as something strippers do because strippers invented it. And that’s okay! It’s okay to have respect for strippers and the hard work they put into what they do! Let’s stop trying to take the stripper part out of pole dancing so upperclass white girls can do it without being ~stigmatized~ because god forbid women be sexual.

Forms of pole dancing have been practised for hundreds of years, as outlined on the International Pole Dance Fitness Association site. Check out Mallakhamb, a form of Indian pole fitness, which is traditionally a male-centric sport. It was Westernised by exotic dancers and circus performers in the 20th century, but the idea has been around for centuries. Claiming that ‘strippers invented it’ kind of erases the pole’s history in other cultures.  

And the IPDFA is campaigning for it to be recognised as an Olympic sport, because it does actually require a lot of athleticism (which is where pole dancing’s roots are). 

"Is ‘fat’ really the worst thing a human being can be? Is ‘fat’ worse than ‘vindictive’, ‘jealous’, ‘shallow’, ‘vain’, ‘boring’ or ‘cruel’? Not to me."
— J.K. Rowling (via kushandwizdom)